Geometric relationships for homogenization in single-phase binary alloy systems
Read Online
Share

Geometric relationships for homogenization in single-phase binary alloy systems

  • 914 Want to read
  • ·
  • 89 Currently reading

Published by National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Scientific and Technical Information Office, for sale by the National Technical Information Service in [Washington], Springfield, Va .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Diffusion,
  • Alloys -- Analysis

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementJalaiah Unnam, George Washington University, Joint Institute for Advancment of Flight Sciences, Langley Research Center, Darrel R. Tenney and Bland A. Stein, Langley Research Center.,
SeriesNASA technical paper ; 1349
ContributionsTenney, Darrel R., joint author, Stein, Bland A., joint author, Joint Institute for Advancement of Flight Sciences, Langley Research Center, United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Scientific and Technical Information Office
The Physical Object
Pagination12 p. :
Number of Pages12
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14932245M

Download Geometric relationships for homogenization in single-phase binary alloy systems

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

  J. Unnam, formerly a Research Associate with the George Washington University JIAFS-Langley Research Center, is now Visiting Professor, Materials Engineering at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA Cited by: 1. vi About the Editor Dr. Hiroaki Okamoto is co-editor of ASM’s primary binary phase diagrams reference work, the three-volume set Binary Alloys Phase Diagrams, Second Edition [Massalski2], and the electronic edition of this work, Binary Alloy Phase Diagrams, Second Edition, Plus Updates, on CD-ROM. He has personally evaluated and published phase diagrams and related data for more systems . Muna Khushaim, Fatimah Alahmari, Nessrin Kattan, Delphine Chassaing, Torben Boll, Microstructural properties and peritectic reactions in a binary Co–Sn alloy by means of scanning electron microscopy and atom probe tomography, Materials Research Express, //abad04, 7, Cited by: Geometric relationships for homogenization in single-phase binary alloy systems A semiempirical relationship is presented which describes the extent of .

  According to Mg–Li binary phase diagram, when the Li content less than wt.%, the alloy is close-packed hexagonal structure (α phase), when the Li content greater than wt.%, the alloy is a body-centered cubic structure (β phase), and the alloy has a hcp + bcc structure when the Li content is between wt.% to wt.%,. It has. Microstructure of investigated alloys after homogenization at the temperature o C for 8h: alloy 1 cooling rate o C/h (a, b), alloy 1 cooling rate 40 o C/h (c, d), alloy 2 cooling rate Dr. Hiroaki Okamoto is co-editor of ASM's primary binary phase diagrams reference work, the 3-volume set Binary Alloys Phase Diagrams, Second Edition [Massalski2]. He has personally evaluated and published phase diagrams and related data for more systems than any other living professional, completing evaluations. A semiempirical formula is developed for describing the extent of interaction between constituents in single-phase binary alloy systems with planar, cylindrical, or spherical interfaces. The formula contains two parameters that are functions of mean concentration and interface geometry of the couple.

In the framework of a diffusion-limited model, the effect of homogenization treatment following precipitate dissolution for a spherical and a planar geometry was considered. It was shown that, for a planar precipitate, the time for complete homogenization is considerably larger than the time required for the precipitate dissolution by ∼two orders of magnitude. The term “high-entropy alloys (HEAs)” first appeared about 10 years ago defining alloys composed of n=5–13 principal elements with concentrations of approximately /n at.% each. Milton Ohring, in Engineering Materials Science, Substitutional Solid Solution. Binary phase diagrams usually contain an assortment of single-phase materials known as solid solutions and these have already been introduced in Sections and In the substitutional solid solution alloy the involved solute and solvent atoms are randomly mixed on lattice sites.   The homogenization kinetics of a typical nickel-base superalloy, Waspaloy, were determined and analyzed in terms of a simple diffusion model. Engineering interdiffusion coefficients for titanium, chromium, and cobalt in the nickel solid solution were comparable to previous measurements for Ni–X binary alloys.